American General under Fire for Evangelical Religion

A distinguished Air Force brigadier general has come under fire from an anti-Christian group seeking to dismantle his personal website.

Brigadier General E. John Teichert has been the target of a complaint leveled by a secular non-profit organization that claims he violated military regulations by maintaining an evangelical website on his own time. Led by Michael “Mikey” Weinstein, the Military Religious Freedom Foundation (MRFF) filed a formal complaint against one of the nation’s most celebrated officers.

The MRFF argues that Teichert’s Christian website violates the U.S. Constitution’s separation of church and state guarantee. The anti-religious organization states that the website also specifically violates military regulations.

“MRFF submits that Brig. Gen. Teichert’s publicly posted remarks demonstrate his discriminatory animus and overt condemnation of all personnel under his command who do not share his personal and particular dominionistic brand of Christianity,” the complaint reportedly states.

“For those members of the 412th Test Wing at EAFB who are, e.g., agnostic, atheist, Hindu, Jewish, Mormon, Muslim, humanists, secularists, etc., his conduct at issue here, ‘seriously compromises (his) standing as an officer.’”

The controversy was initially reported on by Newsweek, which fielded Weinstein’s claims that upwards for 21 complaints have been brought against the decorated Air Force leader. Newsweek was only able to substantiate one. Following a trend of secretive and suspicious undisclosed sources, Newsweek has chosen not to publish the complaint or identity of its author. Some suspect MRFF may be the only outraged party.

Teichert Leads the Air Force’s Best of the Best

Brigadier General Teichert reportedly operates a website that encourages American Christians to pray during lunch called Prayers at Lunchtime for the United States (PLUS). He ranks among the country’s most heralded Air Force leaders and heads the elite Air Force “Wings” sector. This group of top guns are considered the best of the best.

Before his recent promotion to lead the Air Force wings program, Teichert flew combat missions over Iraq, took on hazardous test pilot responsibilities and has been nicknamed the “Dragon.” He stands as a highly decorated officer who has earned the Legion of Merit, Defense Superior Service Medal, and Global War on Terrorism Service Medal among many others.

According to the filings, Teichert has operated the evangelical Christian encouragement site for approximately five years. The PLUS site publishes Bible passages and inspirational essays. It does not mention Teichert as the author. MRFF apparently pieced together the website’s author by investigating biographical information written under the pseudonym “John,” a picture of the general’s epaulet star and notation about a recent military promotion.

The biographical information listed for John, is as follows:

“John is an active duty Brigadier General who has served in the United States Air Force since 1994, and who was saved by grace through faith in Christ in 2004. He has commanded at the wing, group and squadron levels, and is currently serving as Air Force commander. The Lord has blessed his career while burdening his heart with the need for our nation to return to its Christian foundation.”

The single confirmed formal complaint written by MRFF was sent Defense Secretary General James “Mad Dog” Mattis among other Teichert superiors.

Is MRFF Anti-Christian?

Although the MRFF website claims it supports constitutionally guaranteed religious freedom, the verbiage and tone of the news-styled site present differently.

Under Weinstein’s oversight, headlines position the organization as a group of persecuted activists. Others attack conservative and fact-based journalism as liars. Consider these snippets against the organization’s claim as protectors of the U.S. Constitution, “Incoming Hate!!!,” “Christian Religious Extremism,” “Lyin’ On A Prayer.” Under the website’s achievements, the list includes “Another Day…Another MRFF Client Victory for Secular Government over Sectarian Religious Supremacy.”

Among the issues listed in MRFF’s 22-page complaint is one that argues Teichert must include a disclaimer to avoid violating an Air Force standard that requires military personnel to “balance constitutional protections for their own free exercise of religion, including individual expressions of religious beliefs, and the constitutional prohibition against governmental establishment of religion. They must ensure their words and actions cannot reasonably be construed to be officially endorsing or disproving of, or extending preferential treatment for any faith, belief, or absence of belief.”

No Line Crossed

The brave men and women who serve in the U.S. military were largely unaware of the officer’s evangelical endeavors. Brig. Gen. Teichert operated the inspirational Christian site with anonymity and has not, reportedly, been cited for religious bias over the course of his highly successful career. Former military leaders such as retired Army Col. Phil Wright agree that no line has been crossed.

“This general, on his own time, as an expression of his faith, with a non-military website from a non-military computer can state his beliefs,” Wright said. “If you got those under your command formation in, and passed out campaign literature and said you wanted them to vote, then you’ve crossed the line. And I think that would be the same if you forced airmen to go to church, to pray or read the Bible.”

The military leadership has not issued a decision or opinion on Brig. Gen. Teichert’s evangelical website. But it appears that high-ranking Christian military leaders will continue to be targeted by secular and atheist forces such as MRFF and others.

~ Christian Patriot Daily


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